Kayak fishing in Nova Scotia?

Nova Scotia is a province in Eastern Canada, on the North Atlantic coast. It’s located at an equal distance from the equator and the North Pole… Together with the province of New Brunswick, it forms the region known as Atlantic Canada.
Both freshwater and offshore fisheries in this wind swept region are famous worldwide, but it doesn’t exactly fit in the image of kayak fishing as a sport or outdoors activity, which evolved in warmer regions, and so far gained few followers in Northern regions characterized by a colder climate.
But the Wavewalk kayak changes this picture, since it offers far better protection to the angler on board, and it can be easily motorized, even with a gas outboard motor, which is more suitable for moving water and for ocean kayak fishing than electric trolling motors are.

Anglers living in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick have probably never imagined they’d be considering fishing out of a kayak, and those who wish to take a W500 for a test ride can do so at Wavewalk kayaks’ dealership in Atlantic Canada, located in Eastern Passage, a town near Halifax.
Visitors to the recent Halifax International Boat Show could see there a W500 kayak rigged for fishing and outfitted with a 2.6 HP outboard motor from APS. This dealership offers other small outboard motors for sale as well as inflatable boats.

New light on kayak fishing in cold regions

When most people hear “kayak fishing” they imagine someone seated on a sit-on-top (SOT) kayak, which is the kayak design that has gained popularity in warmer regions. Not so in colder regions, where most anglers prefer to fish out of small or full size motorboats, and would not even consider fishing from kayaks.
So, until people in cold regions get used to the idea that they can fish comfortably from a W kayak even in cold water and weather, they’d still imagine kayak fishing as associated with SOT kayaks, and they’ll keep rejecting the notion that they could enjoy fishing out of a kayak.

Cold regions anglers who already fish out of a SOT kayak or are in the process of considering it could benefit from reading a new article about the design of SOT fishing kayaks >
The article explains the presence of scupper holes in the hulls of SOT kayaks. This most unique feature is particularly annoying for SOT anglers because of the tendency that scupper holes have to conduct water from below the kayak’s hull onto its deck as the kayak moves in the (cold) water, and even when it is motionless, such as when the passenger is casting fishing lines or fighting a fish.
If having water on your kayak’s deck and seat area is rather unpleasant in warm water and weather, it is not even an option when you fish in cold regions.
FYI, special scupper plugs are available from several vendors, but when you apply them the water that quite often gets on your SOT kayak’s deck has nowhere to go…

Again, if you want to fish in cold regions you want to stay dry and fish out of a dry kayak, and your only serious option is a W500.

Kayak fishing in cold regions – different aspects and different views

This online magazine is dedicated to fishing from kayaks in cold regions. This implies both cold water and cold weather which can affect the angler and even be hazardous, and cold water fish species, although to a lesser extent.

Judging by the number and quality of fishing kayak reviews and trip reports recently contributed to Wavewalk’s website by northern kayak anglers, the message is finally understood – There is a kayak out there that protects you from cold water and bad weather, allows you to wear normal clothes and not waders or dry suit, or worse – a wetsuit, and even offers you to keep your feet dry when you launch and beach.

Let’s see what we can learn from these kayak anglers:

Most people don’t perceive the San Francisco Bay area as a particularly cold area, but the ocean there is cold, to a point where paddlers, surfers and kayak anglers have to wear wetsuits or dry suits, at least when the summer is over. Says Edwin, from Oakland, who’s passion is crabbing out of his new W kayak: -”This boat is amazing and one of my favorite things about it is its versatility. You literally can do just about anything with this boat… -I am amazed at how easy it is to move at a good cruising clip.
-The sitting/kneeling paddling position really affords a strong stroke with very little effort which doesn’t really help with the “workout” aspect of it ;)
-I have been averaging just over 6km/hr over a 7.5km distance in flat water with no real wind to speak of. While not blazing fast the effort required to do that would allow me to paddle all day. -Changing your position fore/aft really changes the behavior of the boat! I’ve found that for cruising neutral balance really speeds things up.
-Beach launching is a piece of cake as well as you just step in and weight forward until you float, then move back accordingly. Getting down to the beach isn’t hard either as I can just shoulder it and carry my paddle, necessitating only one trip. I like that…”
Edwin is a big guy (6’5″ / 260 lbs), and his experience with common kayaks, including a large-size one has been unpleasant, to say the least. They were uncomfortable and not stable enough for him, and they swamped. Needless to say that carrying and especially hauling heavy crab traps on board a kayak isn’t something that any kayak may allow you to perform, especially if you’re such a big guy. In order for a kayak to allow such performance, it has to be extremely stable, and the Wavewalk 500 is the world’s stablest kayak.

Next on this review is Jeff, from New Zealand’s Southern Island. Again, most people don’t associate New Zealand with cold weather, but it gets really cold there in and around the southern island, where there’s even a mountain range called the New Zealand Alps that’s peppered with glaciers and ski stations…
Says Jeff -”The W500 has no rudder but you don’t need one. It tracks beautifully and if you get side on to a wave you just lean into it and carry on, very stable.
When I got out of the sit-in kayak at the end of a long trip I have to walk around a bit to loosen up my ankles and knees as I have arthritis in both and sitting for long periods with legs stuck in the same position causes a bit of pain. When I pulled on to the beach in the W500 I just stood up and stepped out, no pain. . Felt like I could go out again…The W500 comfort and stability were the biggest sellers for me. I enjoy not having sore ankles and knees at the end of the day. Oh and I have slept on it a few times as well with no concerns about falling overboard…
The other selling point is storage. I have bought some long narrow bins and everything on board goes in them. One for bait one for fishing tackle one for food. There is room for up to four good sized kingies, if you get lucky.”

Joe is a river-rat from Pennsylvania, who lives next to the world famous Susquehanna river, which is a big river, and considered as number one for smallmouth bass fishing. Joe and his friends fish in the fall, and when possible even in winter.
Says Joe: -”I’m not much of a story teller but I stood up most of the time which allowed me to wing a crank bait out and run it through the deep water haunts where the breeders lay.
I had no need to stop, cause I could stand to fish and sit down to relax every so often. This is extremely important to me cause I have gone through three back surgeries and I need to be able to stretch out once in a while so I don’t get stiff.
There was a stiff cross wind blowing up river which would be a problem with any other kayak, but my Wavewalk tracked straight and true even in the cross wind.”

Chris is a fisherman from Gig Harbor, in Washington state. He lives near the Pacific ocean, and here’s a quote from his story about catching his first pink salmon out of his W kayak: -”This boat was designed with fishing in mind. It is truly a stand up fishing platform. Comfortable, roomy, and able to be rigged to meet the fish that you are going after – Great fight and the sport of the kayak makes it all the better!”

Maine is known as a cold, wind-swept state, and although it’s known for its great fisheries, you wouldn’t necessarily want to go kayak fishing there. Says Linwood, a local, elderly and disabled W kayak fisherman: -”I’m a little fella at 6 feet and 265 lbs, and I had my left knee replaced.
I venture to northern Maine, where I lived for 40 years, and do a lot of fly fishing in both remote ponds and large lakes, so this kayak is a lot more convenient than towing my 14 foot Jon boat. Thank you for a kayak I feel I can safely fish out of.
I hadn’t been in a canoe or kayak for 5 years, so it took a little getting use to, but nothing major. Easy in and easy out, and my feet stayed dry. Pretty cool, and it sure paddles well… After being out two more times I found that my replaced knee cap causes my left foot not stay in the proper position very long, under me, without discomfort, when paddling.”

Paul is yet another fisherman from Maine, who says: -”I can tell you that the W is much more comfortable to fish out of than my 16’ [brand name kayak]! I can stand up in the W to stretch my lower back while fishing and then am able to step right out of the W after five or six hours of fishing! So, it’s doing what I wanted it to do.
I have taken the W out in some good wind to see how it performed compared to my canoe and my standard kayak. The W is much better! The W is more stable in the wind and easier to handle than my [brand name kayak] or my [brand name] canoe, too.
So far, I’m very happy with my W. I like it!”

A little south of Maine in Western Massachusetts, Robbie, a local, middle aged paddler and fisherman who goes on long camping, paddling and fishing trips in Vermont and Massachusetts, tells about his experience wit his W kayak: -”I love changing positions, standing while paddling and especially fishing from a standing position, again increasing visibility. I understand why you asked that I use it for half an hour before showing it off to friends. A very steep learning curve, I was so comfortable in half an hour and now after what I estimate to be over 50 hours I am a hopeless show off… Oh, problems? I had to transport 90% of the camping equipment when a friend and I went camping on Grout Pond in Vermont last weekend. We only were a half mile from the launch but made it in one trip. With 2 conventional yaks it would have been several trips at best.”

Says Denise, from yet another part of New England – Rhode Island, a.k.a. The Ocean State: -”I love my Wavewalk!! The first trip out was a bit rough. We took it out offshore on Greenwich bay on a pretty windy day. We (Chris and I were in it together) struggled to keep it straight in the strong current and wind. We were exhausted once we finally made it back to shore.
The next trip out we decided to take it to Roger Williams Park and try it out on the lake. We had a much more pleasant experience! Had no problem keeping the kayak straight and no undercurrent to fight so we didn’t have to work as hard.
We have been out on Greenwich bay many times since but we make sure to look at wind and tide factors before we go. I am considering adding a motor so we can go out on the windy days as well. ”

And back to coastal Massachusetts, with Bill, an elderly saltwater fly fisherman, who says: -”I’m a 6′ 3″ 210lb disabled senior citizen (knee) and I knew that the Wavewalk would be perfect. If only I had known about it before purchasing my [fishing kayak brand name].
I got a tan W500 T and a PSP paddle, and I’ve been a good boy and familiarized myself with the W on a shallow pond before taking it in the salt. On my first trip out on the ocean I made a few casts without looking for fish, just to feel the joy to be able to stand.
I don’t like it, I love it. It is all that I hoped for and more. ” Later, after becoming well acquainted with his W500, Bill says: -”There is no place I’d rather be than in my W on the water when it’s calm and the sun is setting or rising… Hickory Shad and Striped Bass help to make it all the more enjoyable.
I’ll be fishing until at least Oct. and then hunting until I’m iced out. Wind has more of an affect than cold for me.”

Paul Malm is a legendary angler from Northwestern Iowa, in the Midwest. In fact, he’s a professional fisherman, since he runs a fishing guide service and manufactures fishing tackle, which is sold in stores in his area and around it. Says Paul: -”I have recently purchased a new type of fishing kayak called the WaveWalk 500 that’s very useful in the waters around here. I can’t tell you how much I am enjoying the W. I wish I would have bought one sooner!… I have been fishing out of my new WaveWalk 500 fishing kayak and it has been giving me access to waters that others are not able to get to. As a result, I am able to target fish that are not pressured, and it is working very well. It is amazing how much you can see and learn from such a silent , low-profile craft. Fish swim right under you without spooking. Awesome to see! I am now offering kayak trips and kayak fishing through my guide service.” More about Paul, a.k.a. The Musky Guy >
What’s especially interesting with Paul is that he bow fishes standing in his W kayak, and needless to say that one needs a very stable platform for that.
Paul recently caught a state-record (unofficial) sunfish (Read more >)

Upstate New York is yet another cold place, where Ernie, a middle aged, tall and heavy fisherman enjoys his Wavewalk kayak: -”I bought a W500 and have been very happy with it so far. We have a couple large power boats, several kayaks and some canoes, so I have a good basis to compare the W 500 with other boats.
Now you can show a 290 pound guy paddling around with no problem.
Not wet footing is nice – I really like he fact that I can step in and out of the kayak while at a dock, something that is impossible with my other fishing kayaks and relatively difficult with my various canoes.”

And so the list of cold water anglers’ testimonials goes on with variations on similar themes that this magazine discusses in length and breadth. Some talk about their motorized W kayak, others about how being elderly and/or disabled prevented them from fishing out of other kayaks except the W, and many tell about how their large size made paddling kayak and fishing out of them an impossibility, until they started using a W. Many cold water anglers hold small things such as staying dry in high regard, and getting into the kayak and out of it without having to step in water is viewed as a blessing.

For a broader and better overview of what it feels like to fish out of a W kayak, we recommend reading more fishing kayak reviews >


Check out those great fishing lures >

Hudson River Striped Bass Fishing Derby – April 2014

The annual Hudson River Striped Bass Fishing Derby has been taking place for years, and it has become a local much talked about institution. It is organized by the Hudson River Fisherman’s Association (HRFA), and attracts striper fans from the Northeastern United States, from New England to as far south as North Carolina. This time the tournament will be headquartered in Newburgh, NY.

Participants have two days to fish the cold water of the Hudson, and present their catch to several weighing stations along the river. Proceeds from this striper fishing competition benefit The Hudson River Fishermen’s Association and its’ Youth Angler Programs.

Being a large river where many fast motorboats go, and located in a cold region, the Hudson isn’t a place where you’d expect to see many anglers who fish out of kayaks. In fact, local anglers are far more likely to use traditional motorboats for this purpose, starting from big and powerful vessels such as bass boats and center console boats to smaller craft such as jon boats. However, this year the tournament organizers have decided to offer a Wavewalk 500 F2 fishing kayak as first prize, because it is a good platform for striper fishing in such conditions: It is stable, dry and comfortable like no other fishing kayak is, and it offers good protection from cold weather as well as from motorboats’ wakes.
Interestingly, when the W500 is outfitted with an outboard motor, it can travel dozens of miles a day at speeds going up to 8-10 mph, and thus offer a fairly good range of travel to anglers who get impatient with fishing in one spot and want to try fishing in other locations along the river.

Native Americans who lived along the Hudson river called it “the river that flows both ways” due the the presence of strong tidal currents in it. These currents can flow in and out at the same time in different parts of the river – yet another reason to consider using a motorized kayak.

We look forward to this popular fishing contest that attracts hundreds of striper fishing fans every year!

A kayak that’s useful for cold water fishing

Paul Malm is a fishing guide and tackle manufacturer from Iowa , and an expert in fishing for cold water species such as Musky, Pike, etc. In fact, he’s nicknamed the Musky Guy.

I have recently purchased a new type of fishing kayak called the WaveWalk 500 that’s very useful in the waters around here. I can’t tell you how much I am enjoying the W. I wish I would have bought one sooner!

Record_sunfish_bluegill

I’m also offering kayak trips for those who just want to get out for the day and enjoy the experience. This particular design is more stable on the water than any other kayak I have seen. Plus the amount of storage of these unique kayaks blows them all away, too. Fishing while standing is no problem at all, and they are very comfortable to spend extended time in. You can actually lay down in this one!
This has been one the most unusual years I have ever been witness to as far as the weather and the fishing goes. In Northwest Iowa the rains seemed never-ending for a while, especially on weekends. Waters are high all over the area, with levels that have not been seen in a few seasons.
As far as the rivers go, these heavy rains have caused a lot of flooding, and as for fishing, it depends on where you live and what you are fishing for. Because of the unstable rivers and muddy waters, the musky and pike bite has been off and on from day to day. Nothing that you can predict with the crazy barometer this year. The bass, crappie, and big bluegills, on the other hand, have been great this year!

I have been fishing out of my new WaveWalk 500 fishing kayak and it has been giving me access to waters that others are not able to get to. As a result, I am able to target fish that are not pressured, and it is working very well. It is amazing how much you can see and learn from such a silent , low-profile craft. Fish swim right under you without spooking. Awesome to see! I am now offering kayak trips and kayak fishing through my guide service. Right now I am only able to take one person at a time for kayak bookings, but I am hoping to change that shortly.

I am also offering bow-fishing trips. You would be surprised how much fun it is to get a 20 pound carp on the end of an arrow. You can’t stop the smile on your face! Once again, from the kayak I can only do one at a time, but there are other options, too.

I am also offering fishing lessons and classes for small parties or large groups. I have been certified by the State of Iowa DNR as an official “Fish Iowa” Instructor. So not only do I get the honor and privilege of introducing many people to the sport, but this also gives me access to many of the materials the DNR makes available for young or new fishermen, promoting our great fishing in the State of Iowa!

Paul holding a bear cub

I am proud to introduce the latest in my line of terminal tackle. It is another leader, but geared towards finer fishing. This product came up as a result of a day of walleye fishing where the big pike were biting me off every other cast. Not a major problem, but I was after walleye that day, not pike. But walleye will not take to the sight of a heavy leader and it seems a little silly to cast a curly-tail jig on one too. So I went home that night and came up with what I will use from now on when casting for walleye during aggressive feeding. The snap is of my own design again, with nothing to open or close, changing lures in an instant. Whether you fish for bullheads or musky, it is great just to get out and enjoy a little of what nature has to offer.

As far as safety concerns about tandem use. I am picky about who goes out in the W500 with me. There is a certain way to do things that has been working out very well. Large people are not showing interest in kayaking, they want the bigger boat. Most of the people I have taken in the kayak are not large, so no problems there. The way we work it for bow-fishing, the person in front stands and shoots the bow, the person in back is the navigator. This works great! As far as fishing, the client stays seated and fishes in front while I overlook everything from the rear. I have had no issues at all doing things this way. And I still get to cast myself! I am a big one on safety for my clients, if I thought there was any problem at all, I would not be taking them out. A little common sense can go a long way also. Not much of that left in today’s world it seems sometimes.
I forgot to mention that I have explored the option of other kayaks, even before I bought my W500. I was not impressed by any of them. There are a couple that are no doubt usable, but nowhere near as convenient for one person to handle and move around with. My plan is to add at least one more W500 to my inventory. I am just waiting for business to pick up. I know where I can get cheap kayaks right now, but nothing I would care to have clients in or around. I won’t risk my name on shoddy equipment. Like the old saying goes, You get what you pay for! I am sure it won’t be an extended wait before my W500 fleet starts to grow! I am looking forward to it!

Things have been a little slow lately because of the weather. Hot and humid, just like a normal Iowa summer. People tend to think that fish cannot be caught right now. It’s tough to get across that fish can be caught almost all the time, you just have to adjust tactics, time of day, or try another species! I had my youngest son (22) out in the W a couple days ago and he had an absolute blast. He wants to go out again soon. We were bow-fishing, but we were laughing so hard.

Paul Malm

Malm Fishing Services, Northwestern Iowa