Hey Northern Kayak Anglers – Summer Is Over, Autumn Is Here

It’s September 21st, the last day of summer or the first day of autumn? I guess it depends how you want to look at it. For kayak anglers up north it means shorter days, colder water, and more cases of nasty, or at least uncooperative weather. Kayak fishing trips are going to be fewer and far between, until they stop, eventually, and the fishing kayaks are stored.

I’ve been criticized for talking prematurely about cold weather up north, which basically means that this blog already has visitors, including some who are opinionated. I welcome it, of course, but to a certain extent, which that comments should be to the point, and civilized as much as possible, or practically speaking, that they don’t set a bad example for children who read them.

So…. It’s September 21st, the last day of summer or the first day of autumn? I guess it depends how you want to look at it.
For kayak anglers up north it means shorter days, colder water, and more cases of nasty, or at least uncooperative weather.
Kayak fishing trips are going to be fewer and far between, until they stop, eventually, and the fishing kayaks are stored.
Some kayak anglers who are fortunate to own better fishing kayaks that offer full protection from the elements (basically cold wind and cold water), and are more dependable as far as stability goes (I.E. less prone to overturn), will keep fishing until ice covers each and every square foot of their favorite lakes and rivers.

Others will just start the long wait until next summer, do some rigging on their kayaks, yak on kayak fishing forums, and do things that are more appropriate for for our cold winters.

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