Category Archives: Norway

Kayak fishing in cold regions – different aspects and different views

This online magazine is dedicated to fishing from kayaks in cold regions. This implies both cold water and cold weather which can affect the angler and even be hazardous, and cold water fish species, although to a lesser extent.

Judging by the number and quality of fishing kayak reviews and trip reports recently contributed to Wavewalk’s website by northern kayak anglers, the message is finally understood – There is a kayak out there that protects you from cold water and bad weather, allows you to wear normal clothes and not waders or dry suit, or worse – a wetsuit, and even offers you to keep your feet dry when you launch and beach.

Let’s see what we can learn from these kayak anglers:

Most people don’t perceive the San Francisco Bay area as a particularly cold area, but the ocean there is cold, to a point where paddlers, surfers and kayak anglers have to wear wetsuits or dry suits, at least when the summer is over. Says Edwin, from Oakland, who’s passion is crabbing out of his new W kayak: -”This boat is amazing and one of my favorite things about it is its versatility. You literally can do just about anything with this boat… -I am amazed at how easy it is to move at a good cruising clip.
-The sitting/kneeling paddling position really affords a strong stroke with very little effort which doesn’t really help with the “workout” aspect of it ;)
-I have been averaging just over 6km/hr over a 7.5km distance in flat water with no real wind to speak of. While not blazing fast the effort required to do that would allow me to paddle all day. -Changing your position fore/aft really changes the behavior of the boat! I’ve found that for cruising neutral balance really speeds things up.
-Beach launching is a piece of cake as well as you just step in and weight forward until you float, then move back accordingly. Getting down to the beach isn’t hard either as I can just shoulder it and carry my paddle, necessitating only one trip. I like that…”
Edwin is a big guy (6’5″ / 260 lbs), and his experience with common kayaks, including a large-size one has been unpleasant, to say the least. They were uncomfortable and not stable enough for him, and they swamped. Needless to say that carrying and especially hauling heavy crab traps on board a kayak isn’t something that any kayak may allow you to perform, especially if you’re such a big guy. In order for a kayak to allow such performance, it has to be extremely stable, and the Wavewalk 500 is the world’s stablest kayak.

Next on this review is Jeff, from New Zealand’s Southern Island. Again, most people don’t associate New Zealand with cold weather, but it gets really cold there in and around the southern island, where there’s even a mountain range called the New Zealand Alps that’s peppered with glaciers and ski stations…
Says Jeff -”The W500 has no rudder but you don’t need one. It tracks beautifully and if you get side on to a wave you just lean into it and carry on, very stable.
When I got out of the sit-in kayak at the end of a long trip I have to walk around a bit to loosen up my ankles and knees as I have arthritis in both and sitting for long periods with legs stuck in the same position causes a bit of pain. When I pulled on to the beach in the W500 I just stood up and stepped out, no pain. . Felt like I could go out again…The W500 comfort and stability were the biggest sellers for me. I enjoy not having sore ankles and knees at the end of the day. Oh and I have slept on it a few times as well with no concerns about falling overboard…
The other selling point is storage. I have bought some long narrow bins and everything on board goes in them. One for bait one for fishing tackle one for food. There is room for up to four good sized kingies, if you get lucky.”

Joe is a river-rat from Pennsylvania, who lives next to the world famous Susquehanna river, which is a big river, and considered as number one for smallmouth bass fishing. Joe and his friends fish in the fall, and when possible even in winter.
Says Joe: -”I’m not much of a story teller but I stood up most of the time which allowed me to wing a crank bait out and run it through the deep water haunts where the breeders lay.
I had no need to stop, cause I could stand to fish and sit down to relax every so often. This is extremely important to me cause I have gone through three back surgeries and I need to be able to stretch out once in a while so I don’t get stiff.
There was a stiff cross wind blowing up river which would be a problem with any other kayak, but my Wavewalk tracked straight and true even in the cross wind.”

Chris is a fisherman from Gig Harbor, in Washington state. He lives near the Pacific ocean, and here’s a quote from his story about catching his first pink salmon out of his W kayak: -”This boat was designed with fishing in mind. It is truly a stand up fishing platform. Comfortable, roomy, and able to be rigged to meet the fish that you are going after – Great fight and the sport of the kayak makes it all the better!”

Maine is known as a cold, wind-swept state, and although it’s known for its great fisheries, you wouldn’t necessarily want to go kayak fishing there. Says Linwood, a local, elderly and disabled W kayak fisherman: -”I’m a little fella at 6 feet and 265 lbs, and I had my left knee replaced.
I venture to northern Maine, where I lived for 40 years, and do a lot of fly fishing in both remote ponds and large lakes, so this kayak is a lot more convenient than towing my 14 foot Jon boat. Thank you for a kayak I feel I can safely fish out of.
I hadn’t been in a canoe or kayak for 5 years, so it took a little getting use to, but nothing major. Easy in and easy out, and my feet stayed dry. Pretty cool, and it sure paddles well… After being out two more times I found that my replaced knee cap causes my left foot not stay in the proper position very long, under me, without discomfort, when paddling.”

Paul is yet another fisherman from Maine, who says: -”I can tell you that the W is much more comfortable to fish out of than my 16’ [brand name kayak]! I can stand up in the W to stretch my lower back while fishing and then am able to step right out of the W after five or six hours of fishing! So, it’s doing what I wanted it to do.
I have taken the W out in some good wind to see how it performed compared to my canoe and my standard kayak. The W is much better! The W is more stable in the wind and easier to handle than my [brand name kayak] or my [brand name] canoe, too.
So far, I’m very happy with my W. I like it!”

A little south of Maine in Western Massachusetts, Robbie, a local, middle aged paddler and fisherman who goes on long camping, paddling and fishing trips in Vermont and Massachusetts, tells about his experience wit his W kayak: -”I love changing positions, standing while paddling and especially fishing from a standing position, again increasing visibility. I understand why you asked that I use it for half an hour before showing it off to friends. A very steep learning curve, I was so comfortable in half an hour and now after what I estimate to be over 50 hours I am a hopeless show off… Oh, problems? I had to transport 90% of the camping equipment when a friend and I went camping on Grout Pond in Vermont last weekend. We only were a half mile from the launch but made it in one trip. With 2 conventional yaks it would have been several trips at best.”

Says Denise, from yet another part of New England – Rhode Island, a.k.a. The Ocean State: -”I love my Wavewalk!! The first trip out was a bit rough. We took it out offshore on Greenwich bay on a pretty windy day. We (Chris and I were in it together) struggled to keep it straight in the strong current and wind. We were exhausted once we finally made it back to shore.
The next trip out we decided to take it to Roger Williams Park and try it out on the lake. We had a much more pleasant experience! Had no problem keeping the kayak straight and no undercurrent to fight so we didn’t have to work as hard.
We have been out on Greenwich bay many times since but we make sure to look at wind and tide factors before we go. I am considering adding a motor so we can go out on the windy days as well. ”

And back to coastal Massachusetts, with Bill, an elderly saltwater fly fisherman, who says: -”I’m a 6′ 3″ 210lb disabled senior citizen (knee) and I knew that the Wavewalk would be perfect. If only I had known about it before purchasing my [fishing kayak brand name].
I got a tan W500 T and a PSP paddle, and I’ve been a good boy and familiarized myself with the W on a shallow pond before taking it in the salt. On my first trip out on the ocean I made a few casts without looking for fish, just to feel the joy to be able to stand.
I don’t like it, I love it. It is all that I hoped for and more. ” Later, after becoming well acquainted with his W500, Bill says: -”There is no place I’d rather be than in my W on the water when it’s calm and the sun is setting or rising… Hickory Shad and Striped Bass help to make it all the more enjoyable.
I’ll be fishing until at least Oct. and then hunting until I’m iced out. Wind has more of an affect than cold for me.”

Paul Malm is a legendary angler from Northwestern Iowa, in the Midwest. In fact, he’s a professional fisherman, since he runs a fishing guide service and manufactures fishing tackle, which is sold in stores in his area and around it. Says Paul: -”I have recently purchased a new type of fishing kayak called the WaveWalk 500 that’s very useful in the waters around here. I can’t tell you how much I am enjoying the W. I wish I would have bought one sooner!… I have been fishing out of my new WaveWalk 500 fishing kayak and it has been giving me access to waters that others are not able to get to. As a result, I am able to target fish that are not pressured, and it is working very well. It is amazing how much you can see and learn from such a silent , low-profile craft. Fish swim right under you without spooking. Awesome to see! I am now offering kayak trips and kayak fishing through my guide service.” More about Paul, a.k.a. The Musky Guy >
What’s especially interesting with Paul is that he bow fishes standing in his W kayak, and needless to say that one needs a very stable platform for that.
Paul recently caught a state-record (unofficial) sunfish (Read more >)

Upstate New York is yet another cold place, where Ernie, a middle aged, tall and heavy fisherman enjoys his Wavewalk kayak: -”I bought a W500 and have been very happy with it so far. We have a couple large power boats, several kayaks and some canoes, so I have a good basis to compare the W 500 with other boats.
Now you can show a 290 pound guy paddling around with no problem.
Not wet footing is nice – I really like he fact that I can step in and out of the kayak while at a dock, something that is impossible with my other fishing kayaks and relatively difficult with my various canoes.”

And so the list of cold water anglers’ testimonials goes on with variations on similar themes that this magazine discusses in length and breadth. Some talk about their motorized W kayak, others about how being elderly and/or disabled prevented them from fishing out of other kayaks except the W, and many tell about how their large size made paddling kayak and fishing out of them an impossibility, until they started using a W. Many cold water anglers hold small things such as staying dry in high regard, and getting into the kayak and out of it without having to step in water is viewed as a blessing.

For a broader and better overview of what it feels like to fish out of a W kayak, we recommend reading more fishing kayak reviews >

Motorized Fishing Kayak or Versatile Personal Microskiff?

Northern anglers are not particularly fond of kayaks, to say the least. Due to climatic conditions, the idea of fishing out of a kayak is even less appealing to them then it is for southern anglers.

Northern anglers fish out of motorboats, period, and the overwhelming majority of them would not even consider fishing out of a kayak, because they perceive kayaks to be unstable, uncomfortable, wet, lacking sufficient dry storage, and not offering enough range of travel.  This is true for all fishing kayaks out there, whether SOT, sit-in, or hybrid (canoe-kayak), and it’s not true when W fishing kayaks are concerned, especially if you outfit one with a lightweight outboard gas motor.

But northern anglers don’t know much about the fundamental differences between W kayaks and other types of kayaks, and although a growing number of them are starting to use W kayaks, with or without a motor, the majority is still totally committed to traditional motorboats: skiffs, Jon boats,  bass boats, dinghies, etc.

But owning a fishing motorboat doesn’t come cheap, and handling one isn’t easy either. To begin with, you need to transport the boat with a trailer, and you need room to store the boat and the trailer. Then, you can launch only from boat ramps, and that might not be the most convenient thing to do. These boats don’t lend themselves to human powered propulsion, except maybe the smaller skiffs (a.k.a. ‘microskiff) that offer poling in shallow water. As far as mobility goes, bigger and heavier boats don’t travel well in shallow water, fast streams, seaweed infested water, or near rocky beaches… and obviously – you can’t use them in no-motor zones (NMZ).

A motorized W fishing kayak provides solutions to all the above problems, except the psychological and cultural one of its name: Kayak… For this reason, Wavewalk created the Personal Micro Skiff concept and website, which present the noticeable advantages that Northern anglers have to gain from using this craft for fishing: www.microskiff.us

And this is the demo video presenting this new fishing micro skiff:

A Fishing Kayak As a Symbol Of Hope In Ice Cold Scandinavia

Eric, from Walk on Waves, a fishing kayak distributor in Norway and Sweden, sold a W500 about a week ago.
Why would such small news be worth mentioning? Because Norway is a cold country, whose latitude is pretty much the same as Alaska’s, and there’s no navigable water to be found in there this time of year, unless you venture in a part of the Atlantic Ocean known as the North Sea, but that’s a totally different story, involving serious safety issues, hypothermia, etc…

Being situated that far North inevitably means that spring comes later in Norway, even in comparison to cold regions such as the US Northeast, Midwest and Northwest.
This is to say that Norwegian kayak anglers need much patience…

So why would a Norwegian angler buy a W kayak in January, or in February?
Assuming kayak anglers are sensible, and they don’t take a kayak in the ocean and fish in in extremely cold temperatures, the answer would probably be that it has to do with either some extensive rigging projects, or simply with hope: That person wants to sit in their home, surrounded by deep snow, look at their W fishing kayak, and imagine all the fun they’d have with it as soon as the snow goes away, and the ice covering the rivers and lakes melts; The fishing trips, the rigging, maybe camping, or even hunting?

Hope, Patience, Imagination, and the Love of Boating, Paddling, and Fishing – A simple story, yet a significant one.

Are SOT Kayaks Suitable For Fishing In The North Sea?…

They aren’t really, and any sensible angler would think so, simply because SOT kayaks don’t provide their operator with any protection from the cold water and weather that are typical to the North Sea, and to other regions where the climate is cold.

Here’s a recent article on this subject: Hvorfor Wavewalk og ikke S.O.T.(Sit on top) i nordiske strøk.
The author is Eric Overdijk, a Norwegian outdoorsman, kayaker and fisherman, ,who happens to be Wavewalk’s distributor in Norway and Sweden  :)

Coincidence? There are few real coincidences in life -
For many years, Eric used to paddle traditional sea kayaks and touring kayaks, until he realized his back wouldn’t let him do so anymore – The pain was no longer tolerable. Eric discovered the benefits of W kayaks first as a paddler and a camper, and then as a fisherman.

New, Cold Water and Weather Sections in Kayak Fishing Unlimited Magazine

Kayak Fishing Unlimited, our affiliate online kayak fishing magazine, features regional sections, some of which are dedicated to colder regions in the United States and elsewhere, such as Europe.

Kayak Fishing in the Northeastern United States

The Northeastern region of the United States offers both freshwater and saltwater opportunities, and it’s considered one of the best regions in the world as far as fishing is concerned. But since the northeastern climate is colder for the most part, it’s not as good for kayak fishing as the climate in the south. Therefore, you’d find less kayak anglers in this region.
When fishing out of W kayaks is concerned, many anglers in the Northeast have been switching from canoes, common fishing kayaks, and motorboats to this new type of kayak that offers more advantages than any of this watercraft, both inland and offshore.
This section features numerous trip reports, reviews, pictures and movies, rigging tips, and more, from the region’s finest kayak anglers.

Kayak Fishing In The Midwest – A Breakthrough

So far, Midwestern anglers have been reluctant to adopt kayaks as a fishing platform. The reasons for this are many, and they all seem to come down to one word – COLD.
Yes, the climate in the Midwest is not as warm and nice as it is in the southern states, where kayak fishing is the most popular, and sit-in, SOT and hybrid kayaks don’t offer much to protect their passengers from capsizing, or from cold weather and water.
But kayak fishing in cold water and weather now has a kayak that offers both much more stability than the other kayak types can, as well as better protection.
This magazine, Kayak Fishing Unlimited, has a permanent section dedicated to Kayak fishing in the Midwest – trip reports, fishing kayak reviews from Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio” Kayak Fishing in the Midwest. This section features trip reports and fishing kayak reviews from Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota, and Ohio, as well as reviews of rigged fishing kayaks, and even some information about hunting from kayaks, and stories about motorized fishing kayaks.

Developments in Kayak Fishing in Northern Europe

Many North Europeans like to fish, but unlike Americans and Canadian anglers, they fish predominantly from shore, as motorboats are relatively more expensive to purchase and maintain in Europe than they are in North America. Kayak fishing is still unknown to most European anglers, although some progress is being made in some European countries. However, when it comes to fishing from a boat, most European anglers still prefer the traditional platforms, such as motorboats, canoes, dinghies, or belly boats.
There are kayak fishing clubs in some European countries, but the participation is still small, especially when compared to the participation in the southern US states, and and in other warm regions, such as Australia and New Zealand.
Recently, W fishing kayaks have become available for sale in Norway. Anglers from other countries, such as the UK and Italy, still order these kayaks directly from the factory in the USA. The advent of new solution for motorizing fishing kayaks will certainly help many European anglers to switch from traditional boats to fishing kayaks.

Kayak Fishing in Canada

The climate in Canada is cold, and so is the water in this vast country. These climatic facts do not encourage anglers to venture on the water in kayaks for the purpose of using them for fishing. Canadian anglers still prefer canoes, dinghies, and motorboats, when it comes to fishing.
However, now that they are beginning to learn about W kayaks, and the advantages these special kayaks offer when fishing in cold water and weather is concerned, Canadian anglers are becoming increasingly conscious of the new possibilities they face. This is especially true in view of the fact that W kayaks can be easily outfitted with motors, and thus offer a much bigger range of exploration and fishing than non-motorized kayak offer.

Kayak Fishing in the Northwest

Kayak fishing has its fans in the Northwest, although it hasn’t been booming as in the warmer parts of the West Coast.